SCORE

Cook smashes 200 as England dominate

Alastair Cook and Stuart Broad have put England on a dominant position on the third day of the fourth Test against Australia at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

Cook smashes 200 as England dominate

England were 192/2 overnight with Joe Root remaining unbeaten with Cook. Skipper Root scored his 35th half-century. He made 61 runs off 133 balls with 7 fours. The third-wicket partnership ended in 138 runs as Pat Cummins struck.

Also Read - Sabbir accused of incursion against a spectator

Dawid Malan was dismissed before the lunch break. Jonny Bairstow, Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes got out in the 20s. While Cook reached his 150 in 260 balls as England were going closer to Australia’s first innings score.

England lost their eighth wicket for 373 runs. Broad joined Cook in the last session and made Australians toil for wickets. They put on 100 runs for the ninth-wicket. It’s the highest England partnership for the ninth-wicket at the MCG.

Cook brought up his fifth double ton and second in Australia in 360 balls. He became only the fifth overseas and second England batsman to score a double hundred at the MCG. Wally Hammond had scored 200 at this ground in 1928.

The left-hander broke Viv Richards’ score of 208, the previous highest score by an overseas batsman at the MCG that was achieved in 1984.

Broad reached his 12th Test half-century in 59 balls. He wad dismissed after scoring 63-ball 56 including 8 fours and a six. He put on a 100-run partnership with Cook. Cook remained not out on 244 runs from 409 balls with 27 boundaries.

England are 491/9 in 144 overs at stumps. They are leading by 164 runs. Nathan Lyon, Cummins and Josh Hazlewood have taken three wickets each so far.

 

Brief scores:

Australia 327

England 491/9 in 144 overs (Cook 244*, Root 61; Hazlewood 3/95, Lyon 3/109)

 

-Ruffin, Correspondent, bdcrictime.com 1 of 1

Related Articles

Cook rewrites history

Pakistani bowlers shine at Lord’s

Omar’s record came to life

Cook eclipses Mahela, Shiv, Lara

Cook century, England in comfort zone