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South Africa cricketers ‘symptom free’ after self-quarantine


The first of a three-match ODI series between India and South Africa was held in Dharamshala in March 12. Which became abandoned due to rain. The second and third matches were in Lucknow (March 15) and Kolkata (March 18), respectively. But because of the panic over the coronavirus, the board of two countries decided to cancel the next two ODIs of the series.

South Africa cricketers ‘symptom free’ after self-quarantine

The South African cricket team decided to return home in the middle of a visit to India in March following the outbreak of coronavirus. After returning home, the whole team was sent to self-quarantine.

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Up to 14 days, they were kept under close observation. But as Proteas cricketers have not showed any signs of coronavirus, it has been reported that their 14-day isolation period has ended successfully.

“During this time, we kept an eye on whether the symptoms and nature of the disease could be revealed in the players,” said Cricket South Africa’s chief medical officer, Dr Shuaib Manjra. “Luckily, none of the players had symptoms. All the results came out negative.”

But even if the quarantine period has passed, that is not to say that Proteas cricketers can now move around freely. “We are taking all players out of the quarantine period,” said Dr Shuaib Manjra. “But they will comply with government guidelines during this time of lockdown.”

South Africa is scheduled to travel Sri Lanka to play three ODIs and T20s next June. However, the future of the tour also depends on the coronavirus situation.

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