BCB arranging special courses for curators

BCB is resorting to foreign experts to improve the condition of the wicket. New Zealand's Head of Turf Management Ian Mckendry arrived in Bangladesh yesterday

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Khan Mutasim Billah Life
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There are discussions and criticisms about the country's wickets throughout the year. Despite playing well on the country's wicket, the Bangladeshi cricketers of the country go abroad and don’t show good performances- such a picture is seen regularly. Now Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB) has taken the initiative to improve the condition of the country's wickets.
BCB is resorting to foreign experts to improve the condition of the wicket. New Zealand's Head of Turf Management Ian Mckendry arrived in Bangladesh yesterday. BCB Grounds and Facilities Manager Abdul Baten told to the media about Mckendry's visit to Bangladesh, “BCB has taken an initiative by talking to the New Zealand Cricket Board. New Zealand's Head of Turf Management, Ian Mckendry, is a very experienced man who looks after all the grounds in New Zealand. He is also very good in practical and knowledge aspect.”
Abdul Baten added, “We will let him visit the venues first. First tomorrow we will go to Chittagong Zahur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium, from there we will go to Cox's Bazar. Then we will return to Dhaka from Cox's Bazar on 21st. On the 22nd we will go to Sylhet. Our workshops will be on the 23rd and 24th. We have curators, assistant curators, and head groundsmen from Bangladesh who are intimately involved with the wickets, and who build these wickets throughout the year. They will present on the 23rd and 24th."
Regarding the exchange of experience with the curators and the course, Baten further said, “Our main aim is to compare the kind of wickets, outfields, and equipment that New Zealand makes with the methods we adopt in Bangladesh. He will visit the fields and it will be a real experience, he will exchange it (with us). We have put together a detailed course on how New Zealand wickets are made from 9 am to 5 pm for two days (23-24). He will leave after meeting with us on the 25th.”
Pointing out that the course is very important, Baten said, “The course is very important for us. Because for the first time a major New Zealand curator is coming to us. We would like to take maximum knowledge from him so that our groundsman, curators who are there will benefit to the maximum extent.”